E Mail Scams Just Get Funnier by the Day!

E Mail scams - have you ever been a victim of one?

I have had quite a few hilarious E Mail scams  come my way over the years. They have kept me entertained as I marvel at how such wealthy people (who can't wait to share it with li'l old me!) cannot get to grips with English grammar and the spelling of such simple words.

E Mail scams - have you ever been a victim of one? Click To Tweet

For example 'may I please to have mother her maiden name and you bank accunt information thank yo'

'may I please to have mother her maiden name and you bank accunt information thank yo' Click To Tweet

Er...let me think about that for a minute...NO! Oh ok then, my mother her maiden name be Rothschild and my bank 'accunt' information is 1234 GO FCUK YOURSELF!!!!!

Who are these people trawling the internet and sending out this crap to people? E Mail scams probably do catch out some people but I really have no idea how. Here is one I received just this week.

scam emails

I was a little offended that he addressed me as 'sir'. It made me suspect that despite wanting to give me lots and lots of his money, he had not spent time getting to know me well enough to realise I am a madam and not a sir. It also upset me a little that he thinks I did a 'kind respond' to him at some point. Could he be getting me mixed up with someone else?

Surely not because it sounds as if I am the only one he has sent this letter to. After all, I am the chosen one who obviously has enough financial expertise to successfully invest $10,600,00 USD on his behalf.

It was a little worrying that he felt the need to spell out $10,600,000 USD in words. It was almost as if he thought I may not be able to comprehend big numbers with lots of zeros.

It was a little worrying that he felt the need to spell out $10,600,000 USD in words. Click To Tweet

Well of course, I am in the habit of mistaking ten million dollars for ten thousand. I do it all the time when I am playing around on Wall Street. I have a box full of spare zeros that I removed because they were confusing me at the end of a sum. 

Well of course, I am in the habit of mistaking ten million dollars for ten thousand. I do it all the time when I am playing around on Wall Street. Click To Tweet

My maths teacher always said, if you have spare zeros at the end of a sum, don't bother asking me what they're for, just chuck 'em in this box and move on. He gave me the cutest little box and I never bothered him again.

My maths teacher always said, if you have spare zeros at the end of a sum, don't bother asking me what they're for, just chuck 'em in this box and move on. Click To Tweet

So, anyways - as the money was legally placed 'in international bank', I decided that this e mail was probably legitimate. I mean, had he put 'I illegally placed this funds in international bank', I would have been suspicious. And also, the poor chap had been ill.

Awww, my heart just melted. It must have been awful for him explaining to Bashar al-Assad that he was leaving his employment because of 'the world in general' and by the way, taking 'war equipment's' money with him (to give to me to invest). 

So, anyways - as the money was legally placed 'in international bank', I decided that this e mail was probably legitimate. Click To TweetI expect that Mr. Assad said, 'oh yes, that's fine - I know her, she is eminently suitable to set up an engineering company in Asia because she did metal-work at school in her final year. Oh, and she does loads of different crafts. She is great a not bothering to use a ruler to gauge critical measurements; I am sure she would do very well in engineering.'

She is great a not bothering to use a ruler to gauge critical measurements; I am sure she would do very well in engineering.' Click To Tweet

 

Ok - so this stuff isn't really funny. These people are scammers who have probably conned lots of people out of money. So digging deeper into the meta-data behind the email, I found the info you see here in the screen-shot. 'James Angelone' - or whatever his real name is, seems to be connected in some way to an entity called connichi.de - with German connections.

scam emails

.de is the country code top level domain for Germany. Connichi, according to Google, is an annual 3-day anime convention in Germany, held by the German Anime Association. Anime is a term used for Japanese Animation. Their website is connichi dot de. (I have written dot instead of using . because I do not want to link to it.) You can see from the document above, that @connichi dot de is all over the meta-data behind the scam e mail I was sent. 

I am not suggesting that this entity is sending out scam emails but I am curious as to why their domain is all over the back end of an e mail I was sent offering me the chance to have $10,600,000 USD to set up an engineering company in Asia. It's just weird.

scam emails

If you look at the contact list from connichi's website, all the contacts have @connichi.de after them. If you look at my image of the backend data that I found when digging deeper into the hidden email meta-data, you will see it says (Authenticated sender: gewinnspiel @ connichi.de) 

I have no idea why that domain is all over the scam e mail but I would love to know. There may be an innocent explanation of course.

Oh yes, and when I Googled the meaning of gewinnspiel - I found it is German for 'competition', 'lottery', 'sweepstakes' etc. You know, the kind of words one could associate with scams if one was in a sensible mood. 

When I Googled the meaning of gewinnspiel - I found it is German for 'competition', 'lottery', 'sweepstakes' etc. Click To Tweet

e mail scams

My e mail and the associated backend info have now been passed to the UK police department dealing with online fraud.

How about you? Have you been sent any hilarious scam e mails lately? I am just off to the bank to see if my 40% is in there yet. I expect it is because 40% of nothing, give or take a few zeros is...er...NOTHING!

http://content.met.police.uk/Article/Mass-market-fraud/1400010736273/1400010736273

http://www.actionfraud.police.uk

16 comments

  1. These emails always give me a chuckle! It’s saddening really that these things are still around and that some people are unfortunate enough to fall for them. I think spreading the word about these sorts of scams will always help though. Not everyone knows about them and they won’t be the last!

    Thanks for sharing!

  2. 🙂 I had an email awhile back about a supposedly “stranded friend in Italy”. I had not seen this one before and I opened up the email. Should not have done this. Somehow they (the bad folks) – got my email contact list. The spelling and grammar was actually pretty good and I emailed my friend and said I would help, but then as soon as I wrote it, I thought, “CRAP! They fooled me!” They didn’t get any money from me, but it was a reminder to be oh so careful! Happy Holidays to all. I’m stuck at home writing for the website and need rescued!!!
    Jill recently posted…NEW YEAR – NEW RESOLUTIONS – JUST AROUND THE CORNERMy Profile

  3. It’s been so long since I got one of these scam emails I’ve wondered if the tactic was still being used. Sadly I’m not surprised they still are. What’s also interesting is I seem to get a lot of emails from legitimate businesses that have adopted scam tactics such as putting “RE:” in the subject line of a wholly new message or asking questions like, “When can we touch base?”
    I’d like to tell them using these tactics doesn’t make their business look very good but I think it will just encourage them to bombard me even more.
    Christopher recently posted…The Deep End.My Profile

    1. Thanks for visiting. Yes these tactics are still going strong – doubt they will ever go away because they probably do get a certain amount of success – though heaven only knows how!

    1. Ha Ha – not so surprising you didn’t get a reply! I once received one telling me I had won millions in a lottery in some far-flung country (with no ticket being bought of course!) All I needed to do was to pay a massive fee to ‘release’ the money. I wrote and told him he could keep it because I had just won the jackpot in my own country. Thanks for reading and commenting Anna.

  4. I have received one of these ridiculous emails. A friend of mine who leaves Canada every year to spend the winter in Tanzania left for her trip to Africa. The very next day, myself and some of her other friends received an email from her. The email stated that she was stranded in the Philippines, and her luggage had been stolen. She was unable to continue her journey and needed a large amount of money to help get out of the situation with the authorities.
    Really! I don’t know if those jokers looked at an atlas when they made up that story. How a plane on its way to Africa ends up in the Philippines, the totally opposite direction was never explained. Also, when the email was sent she would still be on her journey. It was so pathetic, you have to laugh. My friend had to change her email as it had gone to all her contacts.
    Be careful out there!
    Judith recently posted…A Christmas story – A Cautionary TaleMy Profile

    1. Woah – that’s a really freaky one! There is much to be said for snail-mail. I guess sending it while still on the journey would mean no one could have called her to check the story. Sneaky.

    1. Hi there, thanks for that. Yes I am aware of that and never download or open anything. I just take screen shots and delete the actual emails after passing them on to action fraud. Thanks for your visit.

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